7.0/10
96
3 user 1 critic

20th Century-Fox: The First 50 Years (1997)

The first half century of Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation from its beginnings under Hungarian immigrant William Fox to it emergence as a major studio.

Director:

Kevin Burns

Writer:

Kevin Burns
Reviews

Photos

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
James Coburn ... Narrator / Host
Julie Andrews ... Herself
David Brown ... Himself
Red Buttons ... Himself
Alice Faye ... Herself
Mel Gussow Mel Gussow ... Himself
Frances Klamt Frances Klamt ... Herself
Roddy McDowall ... Himself
Don Murray ... Himself
Sheree North ... Herself
Debbie Reynolds ... Herself
William Reynolds William Reynolds ... Himself
Robert Wagner ... Himself
Eli Wallach ... Himself
Robert Wise ... Himself
Edit

Storyline

The first half century of Twentieth Century Fox Film Corporation is chronicled from its beginnings under Hungarian immigrant William Fox to it emergence as a major studio when it merged with the new Twentieth Century Pictures led by the dynamic producer Darryl F. Zanuck. Clips from some of the studio's first films like the 1917 "Cleopatra" to the disastrous 1963 "Cleopatra" with Elizabeth Taylor. Written by duke1029

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Documentary

Edit

Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

21 January 1997 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Twentieth Century Fox les 50 premières années See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (DVD)

Sound Mix:

Stereo

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

The fifty years covered in the documentary's title are 1915 through 1965. See more »

Quotes

Roddy McDowall: I can remember being on tour with Darryl when the dreaded "Wilson" was playing. It was chloroform. It was endless. I saw it I think fourteen times. It was just...
[rolls his eyes in boredom]
See more »

Connections

Features Bus Stop (1956) See more »

Soundtracks

On the Good Ship Lollipop
Music by Richard A. Whiting
Lyrics by Sidney Clare (1934)
Heard during Temple sequence
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Entertaining look at a great studio
29 June 2006 | by blanche-2See all my reviews

"20th Century Fox: The First 50 Years," narrated by James Coburn, gives us a history of the studio's dual beginnings, merger, and success as a great Hollywood studio under the aegis of the ambitious Darryl F. Zanuck.

There are wonderful clips and homages to some of the stars that made 20th Century Fox great: Will Rogers, Shirley Temple, Tyrone Power, Betty Grable, Henry Fonda, Alice Faye, Don Ameche et al. What's usually missing in these compilations is depth because so much has to be covered, but in this case, they did an okay job. There were also brief comments by stars such as Alice Faye and Roddy McDowell. Of special interest were the early sound tests and a look at the development of Fox's sound system. The early sound clips featured two very young actors, Humphrey Bogart and Spencer Tracy.

20th Century Fox is a particularly fascinating studio because around the late '50s, the lunatics started taking over the asylum, the Cleopatra debacle being a great example as well as all the problems with Marilyn Monroe. There are some clips from the film she did not complete, "Something's Gotta Give," that are great. The fact is, the radiant Monroe was always a problem, as anyone who has ever seen a documentary on Billy Wilder will attest. It's just that once a woman hit 30 in Hollywood - let alone travel down the road past it - the powers that be started to lose patience.

The previous poster mentioned the fickleness of trends as demonstrated by this documentary. I submit it's not the fickleness of trends but of the studios who put some of these great stars out to pasture and/or treated them badly after they'd kept the studios solvent. Since 20th Century Fox is the subject, here are a few examples not mentioned. Alice Faye left because of the hatchet job done on her role in the film "Fallen Angel" in favor of Linda Darnell; there was a small clip shown of "Nightmare Alley," with no explanation that Tyrone Power pleaded with Zanuck to make it, and when Zanuck saw it, he was so terrified for Power's image that he withdrew it from distribution and never publicized it. Nice way to treat somebody who gave you hit after hit after hit. It also isn't mentioned that after "Marie Antoinette," Zanuck refused to lend Power out - not for Ashley in "Gone with the Wind," not for the "The Last Tycoon," which was as a result not made until many years later, not to Harry Cohn, who was desperate to get him for anything, not to Columbia for "Golden Boy," not for "Kings Row." Linda Darnell was of no use to Zanuck when she got married and couldn't play virginal roles anymore, though to her credit, she staged a sexy comeback. And on and on.

Despite its self-serving theme, "20th Century Fox: The First 50 Years" is interesting and entertaining, though a little long. The producers also could have dug a little deeper for unusual clips and paid a little more attention to the clips that were shown. Not everyone has seen "Laura" - was it necessary to show the murderer?


2 of 3 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 3 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page



Recently Viewed