6.5/10
246
19 user 3 critic

Carnegie Hall (1947)

A mother (Marsha Hunt) wants her son (William Prince) to grow up to be a pianist good enough to play at Carnegie Hall but, when grown, the son prefers to play with Vaughan Monroe's ... See full summary »

Director:

Edgar G. Ulmer

Writers:

Karl Kamb (screenplay), Seena Owen (story)
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Marsha Hunt ... Nora Ryan
William Prince ... Tony Salerno Jr.
Frank McHugh ... John Donovan
Martha O'Driscoll ... Ruth Haines
Hans Jaray ... Tony Salerno Sr. (as Hans Yaray)
Olin Downes ... Olin Downes
Joseph Buloff ... Anton Tribik
Walter Damrosch ... Walkter Damrosch
Bruno Walter ... Bruno Walter
Lily Pons ... Lily Pons
Gregor Piatigorsky ... Gregor Piatigorsky
Risë Stevens ... Risë Stevens
Artur Rodzinski ... Artur Rodzinski
Artur Rubinstein ... Artur Rubinstein
Jan Peerce ... Jan Peerce
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Storyline

A mother (Marsha Hunt) wants her son (William Prince) to grow up to be a pianist good enough to play at Carnegie Hall but, when grown, the son prefers to play with Vaughan Monroe's orchestra. But Mama's wishes prevail and the son appears at Carnegie Hall as the composer-conductor-pianist of a modern horn concerto, with Harry James as the soloist. Frank McHugh is along as a Carnegie Hall porter and doorman, and Martha O'Driscoll is a singer who provides the love interest for Prince. Meanwhile and between while a brigade of classical music names from the 1940's (and earlier and later)appear; the conductors Walter Damrosch, Bruno Walter, Artur Rodzinski, Fritz Reiner and Leopold Stokowski; singers Rise Stevens, Lily Pons, Jan Peerce and Ezio Pinza, plus pianist Arthur Rubinstein, cellist Gregor Piatigorsky and violinist Jascha Heifetz. Written by Les Adams <longhorn1939@suddenlink.net>

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Genres:

Music | Drama

Certificate:

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

28 February 1947 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

A Catedral da Música See more »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Federal Films (II) See more »
Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

A hole was made in the ceiling of Carnegie Hall to accommodate sound and lighting equipment for the filming in 1947 and remained there until renovations were done in the 1990's. See more »

Goofs

Johns arrives on stage for rehearsal and is introduced to Ruth who is standing opposite of him with the piano in between. Close up of Ruth's face shows her looking to her left as she speaks to John who is center to her. See more »

Connections

Featured in Edgar G. Ulmer - The Man Off-screen (2004) See more »

Soundtracks

Symphony no. 5: Second movement
(uncredited)
Music by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky
New York Philharmonic conducted by Leopold Stokowski
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User Reviews

 
Slight story in no way spoils beauty and brilliance
9 May 2009 | by morrisonhimselfSee all my reviews

"Carnegie Hall" really deserves a 20 out of 10 stars simply because it is such a brilliant record of some of the greatest musical performers from about 1890 to about 1950.

Most people reading this comment will not have had any other opportunity to see or hear in live performance such giants as Jan Peerce or Jascha Heifetz or, especially, the likes of Walter ("Good morning, my dear children") Damrosch.

It would be easy to fill several paragraphs just listing and raving about those giants, those icons of great music, including Harry James and Vaughn Monroe, but I urge you to look at each name, follow the IMDb link and then Google each to learn about them.

I must, though, mention the marvelous Marsha Hunt. For some function I don't remember, I was in her home when she was the Honorary Mayor of Sherman Oaks, around 1980, and have been an idolatrous fan ever since.

She is recognized as a fine actress, but she deserved even more. She was also a beautiful woman, and probably never looked lovelier than in "Carnegie Hall." As her character ages, she goes gray, and her step slows and she dodders just a bit, just enough.

It is, in short, a spell-binding characterization, a magnificent performance.

I try not to be envious of people with more ability (which is most people) or more luck (which is nearly everyone) but I do envy Marsha Hunt for her opportunity, in this role, to interact with such musical heroes as Ezio Pinza and Artur Rodzinski.

By the way, look for a very young Leonard Rose, who went on to well-deserved fame as one of the world's greatest cellists.

One final note: The story was by the magnificent Seena Owen, probably best known for her role in "Intolerance." Maybe I shouldn't admit it, but I will: I applauded and cheered and, yes, cried at the beauty of this film, at the glory of it.

I urge, strenuously urge you not to miss this "Carnegie Hall."

Added 19 June 2015: "Carnegie Hall" is available at YouTube.com: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ruvljAjzscg


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